biological chemistry

Disaccharides: Properties, Structure, Formation and Examples (Short Lecture Notes)

Disaccharides Lecture Notes

(Carbohydrates Part 3: Properties, Structure and Examples of Disaccharides)

What are Disaccharides?

Disaccharides are carbohydrates which contain two covalently linked monosaccharide units. Sucrose, Maltose, Lactose, Trehalose and Cellobiose are naturally occurring disaccharides. The individual monosaccharide units in a disaccharide are called ‘residues’. All disaccharides are soluble in water

Glycosidic bonds links monosaccharide units

The monosaccharide units in disaccharides (and also in polysaccharides) are linked through a special type of covalent bond called Glycosidic bond (specifically O-glycosidic bond). O-glycosidic bond is formed by the reaction between the hydroxyl group of one monosaccharide with the anomeric carbon atom of the other. During the glycosidic bond formation, one molecule of water is eliminated as given in the diagram. Glycosidic bonds are strong covalent bonds and they can be hydrolyzed by treating with mild acids. The hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond of a disaccharide releases its corresponding monosaccharide units.

Structure of Glycosidic Bond

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