Botany lecture notes

Parenchyma Cells in Plants: Structure, Classification and Functions (PPT)


functions of parenchyma

Parenchyma
(Structure, Classification and Function of Parenchyma)

What is simple tissue?

Ø  The tissue (a group of cells with particular function) composed of single type of cells.

Ø  Three types of simple tissue system in plants:

(1).  Parenchyma

(2).  Collenchyma

(3).  Sclerenchyma

What are the characteristics of Parenchyma (Parenchymatous Cells)?

Ø  Parenchyma is a simple permanent tissue.

Ø  They are living cells which contains plenty of water.

Ø  Cells are nucleated with prominent nucleus.

Ø  They are thin walled cells.

Ø  Cell wall composed of cellulosic primary cell wall only.

Ø  No lignin deposition in the cell wall of parenchyma.

Ø  Parenchymatous cells are relatively undifferentiated

Ø  Parenchyma is the least specialized along simple permanent tissues in plants.

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Zoology lecture notes and study materials

Epithelial Tissue: (Types, Structure, Functions & Examples)


classification of epithelial cells

Classification of Epithelial Tissue in Animals

Epithelial Tissue: (Structure, Classification and Functions)
(Structure Classification and Functions of Simple and Compound Epithelium)

What is Epithelium?

Ø  Epithelium is a tissue system in animals.

Ø  Epithelium constitutes the outer layer of body surfaces, linings of the alimentary canal and the walls of hollow structures.

Ø  It covers the internal or external surfaces of the body.

Ø  Epithelial cells are held together by carbohydrate based cementing materials.

Ø  They also possess special junctions between the cells.

Ø  The bottom layer of epithelium is rest on the basement membrane.

Ø  The basement membrane composed of a network of fibrous proteins particularly rich in collagens.

Ø  Epithelial layers are NOT provided with any blood vessels.

Ø  The cells of the epithelium obtain nutrients and oxygen by diffusion from the lymphatic vessels.

Ø  Nerve endings occur in the epithelial tissues for receiving stimuli.

What are the Functions of Epithelial Tissue?

Ø  Epithelium provides protection to the underlying structures.

Ø  Protect organs from injuries by external agencies or pressure.

Ø  Prevent infection by microorganisms.

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biological chemistry

Chemical Bonds Involved in Protein Structure and Conformation


bonds stabilizing protein structure

Bonds involved in Protein Structure
(Bonds Stabilizing the Primary, Secondary, Tertiary and Quaternary Structure of Proteins)

Proteins are the polymers of amino acids. Amino acids are joined together by a special type of covalent bond (peptide bond) to form linear structures called polypeptides. The polypeptides are then folded into specific structures to form the functional conformation of the protein. The folding of proteins into specific shapes and conformations are assisted and stabilized by many types of bonds in them. Some of these bonds are strong bonds whereas others are weak interactions. Important types of bonds involved in protein structure and conformation are Peptide bonds, Ionic bonds, Disulfide bonds, Hydrogen bonds and Hydrophobic Interactions. The current post describes the importance of each of these bonds and their role in the functional conformation of the protein.

What are the different types of bonds present in a protein?

Ø  Typically, proteins possess the following FIVE types of bonds.

(1).    Peptide bond

(2).   Ionic bond

(3).   Disulfide bond

(4).   Hydrogen bond

(5).   Hydrophobic Interactions

(1). Peptide Bond

Ø  Peptide bond definition: a covalent bond formed between the carboxylic group of one amino acid and the amino group of another amino acid.

Ø  Peptide bond is a strong covalent bond with high bond dissociation energy.

Ø  It is formed by the joining of two amino acid residues during protein synthesis.

Ø  The carboxylic group (- COOH) of one amino acid combine with the amino group (-NH2) of another amino acid to form the peptide bond.

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biological chemistry

Classification of Proteins Based on Structure and Function

protein classification

Classification of Proteins

Proteins are important macromolecules of the cells, formed by the polymerization of amino acids according to the sequence of genetic code in the mRNA. Proteins are the mode of expression of the genetic information. They perform a variety of duties in the cells such as they act as the structural components of cells, enzymes, hormones, pigments, storage proteins and some toxins in the cells. The proteins are classified into many categories based on different criterions.

Criterion for the classification of proteins:

Ø  Proteins are classified based on the following THREE criterions:

                             (I).     Classification based on STRUCTURE of Protein

                            (II).    Classification based on COMPOSITION of Protein

                           (III).    Classification based on FUNCTIONS of Proteins

(I). Classification of Proteins based on the Structure of Proteins

Ø  Based on the structure, proteins are classified into 3 groups.

(A).   Fibrous Proteins

(B).   Globular Proteins

(C).   Intermediate Proteins

(A). Fibrous Proteins

Ø  They are linear (long fibrous) in shape.

Ø  Secondary structure is the most important functional structure of fibrous proteins.

Ø  Usually, these proteins do not have tertiary structures.

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Ecology Lecture Notes

Xerophytes: Ecological Adaptations with PPT


ecological adaptations of xerophytes ppt

Xerophytic Adaptations of Plants
(Ecological Adaptations of Desert Plants)

What are xerophytes?

Ø  Xerophytes (xerophytic plants) are plants growing in dry habitats (xeric conditions) where the availability of water is very less.

Ø  Xeric habitat: places where water is NOT present in adequate quantity.

Ø  Xerophytes are the characteristic plants of deserts or semi-deserts areas.

Ø  Xerophytes can also grow in mesophytic conditions.

Ø  Xerophytes can tolerate:

$.  Extreme dry condition

$.  Low humidity

$.  High temperature

$.  High wind-flow

Ø  Three types of xeric habitats occurs on the earth:

(1). Physically dry habitat: the water retaining capacity of the soil very low and climate is dry (Example: a desert).

(2). Physiologically dry: water is present in excess, but not in the absorbable conditions or the plants cannot absorb it (Example: high salt water, high acidic water and high cold water, water as snow).

(3). Physically and physiologically dry: water present as mist, plants cannot absorb water from the atmosphere directly. (Example: mountain slopes)

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