Difference between the Physiological Response of Auxins and Gibberellins in Plants


Compare Effect Auxin Gibberellin

Physiological Effects of Auxins vs Gibberellins
(Difference between the Physiological Effects of Auxins and Gibberellins in Plants)

Auxins and Gibberellins are two major classes of plant hormones. Both hormones significantly influence the growth and various developmental processes in plants such as organogenesis, root initiation, sex expression, flowering etc. The physiological responses of Auxins and Gibberellins show many differences. The present post discusses the difference between the physiological effects of Auxins and Gibberellins in plants with a comparison table.

Difference between the Effects of Auxins and Gibberellins

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Difference between the Physiological Effects of Gibberellic Acid and Abscisic Acid – Comparison Table


Compare effects of GA and ABA

Gibberellic Acid (GA) vs Abscisic Acid (ABA)
(Difference between the Physiological Effects of Gibberellic acid and Abscisic Acid in Plants)

Gibberellin (Gibberellic Acid) and Abscisic Acid (ABA) are two important plant hormones. Plant Hormones also called ‘Phytohormones’ or ‘Plant Growth Substances’, are signaling molecules produced in very minute quantities in the plants that have immense physiological and metabolic effects. They regulate the growth and development of plants.

The present post discusses the Difference between the Physiological effects of Gibberellin (Gibberellic Acid) and Abscisic Acid (ABA) in plants with a Comparison Table.

Gibberellic Acid: Gibberellic acid or gibberellin, abbreviated as GA, is a major phytohormone produced by some plants and microbes (fungi) which promote the growth and cell elongation. Gibberellic acid was first identified in Japan as a metabolic by-product of a plant pathogenic fungus called Gibberella fujikuroi. The infection of rice plants with this fungi cause a disease called ‘bakane’ meaning ‘foolish seedlings’. The diseased plants will grow much taller than the normal and they eventually die because they are not sturdy enough to support their own weight. The excessive elongation of the internodes in these infected plants was found be to be due to the effect of Gibberellic acid produced by the pathogen.

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Difference between Transpiration and Guttation – A Comparison Table


Transpiration vs Guttation

Transpiration vs Guttation (A Comparison Table)
(Similarities and Differences between Transpiration and Guttation Process)

Transpiration and Guttation are the two physiological events in plants by which the plants release water to the external atmosphere.

Transpiration: Transpiration is the excessive loss of water from the aerial portion of plants as water vapours. Even though the transpiration results in excessive loss of water, it helps to maintain the continuous absorption water from the soil through a force called the ‘Transpiration Pull’. Thus, the transpiration is considered as a ‘Necessary Evil’ in plants.

Guttation: Guttation is the process of secretion of liquid water through the leaf tips in some plants. These plants possess a specialized structure at their leaf tip and margins called Hydathodes. The guttation usually occurs in the morning time when the atmosphere humidity will be high and the rate of transpiration will be low.

Similarities between Transpiration and Guttation

Ø  Both transpiration and guttation primarily occurs though leaf.

Ø  In both cases, the water is lost through specialized pores.

Ø  Both transpiration and guttation cause permanent water loss from the plant.

Difference between Transpiration and Guttation

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