Human Physiology Lecture Notes

Difference between Primary and Secondary Myofilaments – Comparison Table


primary vs secondary myofilaments

Primary Myofilaments vs Secondary Myofilaments
(Difference between the Primary Myofilaments and Secondary Myofilaments of Myofibrils)

Myofilaments are the filaments of myofibrils (myofibrils are the basic structural unit of muscle cells). The myofilaments are composed of proteins particularly actin and myosin. The detailed structural analysis shows that the muscle sarcomere composed of bundles of two types of myofilaments called primary myofilaments and secondary myofilaments. The present post discusses the difference between the Primary Myofilaments and Secondary Myofilaments with a comparison table.

Learn more: Difference between A-Band and I-Band

Difference between Primary and Secondary Myofilaments

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Human Physiology Lecture Notes

Difference between A-Band and I-Band of Sarcomere – Comparison Tab


A-band vs I-band

A-Band vs I-Band
Difference between A-Band and I-Band of a Sarcomere

The basic structural and functional unit of a striated muscle is called the Sarcomere. The sarcomere is the repeating units of a striated muscle occur between two Z-lines. This gives the striated appearance of the skeletal or cardiac muscles. The sarcomere composed of myofibrils, an array elongated contractile protein threads found in striated muscle cells. There are two types of myofibrils in the sarcomere called thin filaments and thick filaments. The thin filaments are made of protein called Actin and the thick filaments are made of proteins called Myosin. The actin and myosin filaments in a sarcomere are arranged in a specific manner so that their overlapping and interlocking patterns produce distinct bands when they are observed under a microscope. These bands are technically called as A-bands (Anisotropic) and I-Bands (Isotropic). The present post discusses the Difference between A-bands and I-bands with a comparison table.

Sarcomere diagram

Structure of Sarcomere (Source: Wikipedia)

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Zoology lecture notes and study materials

Similarities and Difference between Simple and Compound Epithelial Tissue


Simple vs Compound Epithelial Tissue

Simple Epithelium vs Compound Epithelium
(Similarities and Difference between Simple and Compound Epithelial Tissues)

Epithelial tissue is a tissue system in animals that forms the outer layer of body surfaces, the linings of the alimentary canal and the walls of hollow structures. It covers the internal or external surfaces of the body. In the previous post, we have discussed the Structure, Classification and Functions of Epithelial Tissues. Based on the number of cell-layers, the epithelial tissues are classified into Simple Epithelial Tissue and Compound (Stratified) Epithelial Tissue. The present post discusses the Similarities and Differences between Simple and Compound Epithelial Tissues in animals.

classification of epithelial cells

Classification of Epithelial Tissue

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Human Physiology Lecture Notes

Difference between Bone and Cartilage – Comparison Table


bone vs cartilage

Bone vs Cartilage
(Similarities and Differences between Bone and Cartilage)

Bone and cartilage are connective tissues which form the skeletal system in the body. Bones are hard and tough which gives the structural framework of the skeleton in the body. Cartilages are soft and flexible components present in ear, nose and joints. Cartilage acts as shock absorbers between two bones and they prevent the rubbing between them the bones. Even though the bones and cartilages are connective tissues and they are the components of the skeletal framework, both show considerable differences in their formation, organization and functions. The present post discusses about the Similarities and Differences between Bone and Cartilage with a Comparison Table.

Similarities between Bone and Cartilage

Ø  Both bone and cartilage are connective tissues.

Ø  Both are the components of the skeletal system.

Ø  Both provide shape to body parts.

Ø  Both provide protection to vital organs.

Ø  Both are mesodermal in origin.

Ø  Both composed of specialized cells embedded in the matrix of fibrous proteins.

Haversian canal Structure

image source: wikipedia

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