Phase Contrast Microscopy – Optical Components, Working Principle and Applications (Short Notes with PPT)


Applications of phase contrast microscope

Phase Contrast Microscopy
(Optical Components, Working Principle and Applications of Phase Contrast Microscope)

Working Principle of an Ordinary Microscope:

contrast in light microscopyIn an ordinary microscope, the object is viewed due to differences in colour intensities of the specimen. To create the colour intensities, the specimen is first stained with suitable dyes which will impart specific colour. In an ordinary microscope, the contrast is obtained when the light rays pass through a stained specimen because different stains absorb different amounts of light. These differential absorption properties of stained specimen modify the intensity or amplitude of the light waves transmitted by different regions of the cells and this ultimately creates contrast in the image. Thus, staining is essential to create contrast in an ordinary microscope. Moreover, the unstained specimen cannot be observed through an ordinary microscope.

Download the PPT (Phase Contrast Microscopy)

Why Phase Contrast Microscope?

The Phase Contrast Microscope is used to visualize unstained living cells. Most of the stains or staining procedures will kill the cells.  Phase contrast microscopy enables the visualization of living cells and life events.

Continue reading

Difference between Lyophilic and Lyophobic Sols – Comparison Table


Compare Lyophilic and Lyophobic Sols

Lyophilic Sols vs Lyophobic Sols
(Difference between Lyophobic and Lyophilic Sols)

Sols are colloidal systems in which a solid is dispersed in a liquid. There are two types of sols – (1) Lyophobic Sols and (2). Lyophilic Sols

(1). Lyophilic sols: They are solvent loving sols. In lyophilic sols, the dispersed phase shows a positive affinity for the dispersion medium (solvent). The high affinity of dispersed particles with the dispersed medium is due to the formation of a large number of hydrogen bonds.

(2). Lyophobic sols: They are solvent hating sols. In lyophobic sols, the dispersed phase does not have any attraction for the dispersion medium.

Continue reading