Molecular Biology Tutorials

Intrinsic Pathway of Apoptosis (Apoptosis Molecular Mechanism Part 1)


Mitochondrial Apoptosis Signaling

Intrinsic Pathway of Apoptosis
(The Mitochondria Mediated Programmed Cell Death Pathway)

In the previous post, we have discussed the characteristic features and significance of programmed cell death or apoptosis. As we discussed, the stimuli for the execution of programmed cell death can be of internal or external to the apoptotic cell. Based on the source of stimuli, there are two types of apoptosis signaling pathways operate in the cells. They are (1) Intrinsic pathway (stimuli are internal) and (2) Extrinsic pathway (stimuli are external) of apoptosis. Even though both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways considerably different, there is always cross-talk between these two pathways. In the present post, we will discuss the details of INTRINSIC PATHWAY of apoptosis signalling.

What is meant by Intrinsic Pathway of Apoptosis?

In the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, the death-inducing stimuli are originated inside the target cell itself. Mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, have a significant role in executing the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Thus, the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis is also known as the Mitochondria-mediated death pathway.

What are the stimuli for the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis?

Most commonly observed internal stimuli for the initiation of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis are:

Ø  Severe genetic damage

Ø  Lack of oxygen (hypoxia)

Ø  Very high concentration of cytosolic Ca2+ ions

Ø  Presence of some viral proteins

Ø  Severe oxidative stress due to the production of free radicals

What are Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma-2) family proteins?

The intrinsic pathway of apoptosis is facilitated by the members of Bcl-2 family proteins. The members of the Bcl-2 family proteins are characterized by the presence of one or more BH domains (Bcl-2 Homology Domain). The first identified member of Bcl-2 family proteins is Bcl-2 itself. The Bcl-2 was first identified as a cancer-causing oncogene in some human lymphomas. The gene which codes for the Bcl-2 protein was over-expressed in these cancer cells due to translocation. However, later studies have shown that Bcl-2 is not directly acting as an oncogene. They act as the oncogene by promoting the survival of the cancerous cells that would otherwise die by apoptosis.

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Molecular Biology Tutorials

Apoptosis: The Molecular Mechanism of Programmed Cell Death (Short Notes)


Programmed Cell Death Short Notes

Apoptosis: The Programmed Cell Death

What is Apoptosis? Why apoptosis is known as the ‘Programmed Cell Death’?

The total number of cells in an organ or organism is fundamentally fixed to a specific range in all multicellular organisms. In every multi-cellular organism, the cell number is effectively controlled by two strategies- (a) by regulating cell Division and (b) by regulating cell Death. If cells are no longer needed, they commit suicide (self-destruction) by activating an intracellular death signaling programme. Thus, this death process is known as ‘Programmed Cell Death’. This programmed cell death pathway is called Apoptosis.

The term apoptosis in Greek literally mean ‘falling off’. Just like the old leaves ‘falloff’ from the trees without affecting the life of the plant, the apoptotic cell death will not interfere with the functioning of the organ and organism. The most striking feature of apoptosis is that if a cell undergoes the programmed cell death, the neighboring cells are not at all damaged. Apoptotic death of a cell and its subsequent phagocytosis by a neighboring cell or by a macrophage allow the organic components of the death cell to be effectively recycled.

Learn more: Difference between Apoptosis and Necrosis

The apoptosis is better known as the ‘Programmed Cell Death’. It is a natural well-orchestrated, well sequenced and timely executed chain of events leads to the death of a cell.

What are the characteristics of Apoptotic Cell Death?

An apoptotic cell death is characterized by:

Ø  Shrinkage of the cell

Ø  Shrinkage of the nucleus

Ø  Loss of adhesion to the neighboring cells

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