Difference between the Physiological Response of Auxins and Gibberellins in Plants


Compare Effect Auxin Gibberellin

Physiological Effects of Auxins vs Gibberellins
(Difference between the Physiological Effects of Auxins and Gibberellins in Plants)

Auxins and Gibberellins are two major classes of plant hormones. Both hormones significantly influence the growth and various developmental processes in plants such as organogenesis, root initiation, sex expression, flowering etc. The physiological responses of Auxins and Gibberellins show many differences. The present post discusses the difference between the physiological effects of Auxins and Gibberellins in plants with a comparison table.

Difference between the Effects of Auxins and Gibberellins

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Difference between the Physiological Effects of Gibberellic Acid and Abscisic Acid – Comparison Table


Compare effects of GA and ABA

Gibberellic Acid (GA) vs Abscisic Acid (ABA)
(Difference between the Physiological Effects of Gibberellic acid and Abscisic Acid in Plants)

Gibberellin (Gibberellic Acid) and Abscisic Acid (ABA) are two important plant hormones. Plant Hormones also called ‘Phytohormones’ or ‘Plant Growth Substances’, are signaling molecules produced in very minute quantities in the plants that have immense physiological and metabolic effects. They regulate the growth and development of plants.

The present post discusses the Difference between the Physiological effects of Gibberellin (Gibberellic Acid) and Abscisic Acid (ABA) in plants with a Comparison Table.

Gibberellic Acid: Gibberellic acid or gibberellin, abbreviated as GA, is a major phytohormone produced by some plants and microbes (fungi) which promote the growth and cell elongation. Gibberellic acid was first identified in Japan as a metabolic by-product of a plant pathogenic fungus called Gibberella fujikuroi. The infection of rice plants with this fungi cause a disease called ‘bakane’ meaning ‘foolish seedlings’. The diseased plants will grow much taller than the normal and they eventually die because they are not sturdy enough to support their own weight. The excessive elongation of the internodes in these infected plants was found be to be due to the effect of Gibberellic acid produced by the pathogen.

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Difference between Lyophilic and Lyophobic Sols – Comparison Table


Compare Lyophilic and Lyophobic Sols

Lyophilic Sols vs Lyophobic Sols
(Difference between Lyophobic and Lyophilic Sols)

Sols are colloidal systems in which a solid is dispersed in a liquid. There are two types of sols – (1) Lyophobic Sols and (2). Lyophilic Sols

(1). Lyophilic sols: They are solvent loving sols. In lyophilic sols, the dispersed phase shows a positive affinity for the dispersion medium (solvent). The high affinity of dispersed particles with the dispersed medium is due to the formation of a large number of hydrogen bonds.

(2). Lyophobic sols: They are solvent hating sols. In lyophobic sols, the dispersed phase does not have any attraction for the dispersion medium.

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Difference between Innate Immunity and Adaptive Immunity – Comparison Table


Compare Adaptive and Innate Immunity

Innate Immunity vs Adaptive Immunity
Differences between Innate (Native) Immunity and Adaptive (Acquired) Immunity

The main function of immune system in our body is to prevent or resist infections by pathogenic microorganisms. The immune system in an organism is initiated with the recognition of the invading microorganism. The immunity against the invading microbes shown by our body can be grouped into two broad categories – (1) Innate Immunity and (2) Adaptive Immunity. These two immune systems act together to defend the body against infections and diseases.

(1). Innate Immunity: It is also called the Native Immunity. Innate immunity is the nonspecific resistance that an individual possesses by birth. This immune system operates through physical barriers such as skin, chemical in the blood and by immune cells. The innate immunity is due to the genetic makeup of the organism and it does not require the prior contact with microorganisms. The innate immunity acts as the very first level of defense system in our body.

(2). Adaptive Immunity: It is also called as Acquired Immunity or Antigen Specific Immunity. It is the specific resistance acquired by an individual during its life and it is mediated by B- and T- lymphocytes after exposure to specific antigen. The adaptive immune system is characterized by the formation of antibodies (immunoglobulins) and immunological memory.

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Difference between Active Immunity and Passive Immunity – Comparison Table


Compare active and passive immunity

Active Immunity vs Passive Immunity
(Similarities and Differences between Active and Passive Immunity)

The acquired immunity is the immunity acquired by an organism during its life. The acquired immunity against a particular microbe may be induced by the host’s response to the microbe or by the transfer of antibodies or lymphocytes specific for the microbes. Based on the above criteria, the acquired immunity is categorized into two types – (1) Active Immunity and (2) Passive Immunity.

Active Immunity: The active immunity is the direct response of your body against the pathogens. It is induced by the exposure to a foreign antigen such as the antigen of microbes. It is an adaptive response of the individual after contact with specific pathogen or antigen.

what is active immunity

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