Botany lecture notes

Difference between Leptosporangium and Eusporangium (Comparison Table)


Leptosporangium vs eusporangium Development

Eusporangia vs Leptosporangia
(Similarities and Differences between Leptosporangia and Eusporangia of Pteridophytes)

Sporangia are the specialized spore producing structures found in plants. In Pteridophytes, two types of sporangia are present. The two types of sporangia are (1) Eusporangium and (2) Leptosporangium. This classification is proposed by Goebel in 1881 based on the developmental pattern of sporangia. The spores produced in the Eusporangium are called eusporangiospores and those produced in the Leptosporangium are called leptosporangiospores.

Eusporangium: The sporangium develops from a GROUP of INITIAL cells and such a development is called development.

Leptosporangium: The sporangium develops from a SINGLE INITIAL cell and such a development is called Leptosporangiate development.

The present post describes the Similarities and Differences between a Eusporangium and Leptosporangium.

Similarities between Eusporangium and Leptosporangium

Ø  Both Eusporangia and Leptosporangia are the spore producing structures in vascular plants.

Ø  Both are formed on the sporophyll (a specialized leaf) of the diploid sporophytic plant.

Ø  Both produce haploid spores after meiosis.

Ø  The first division of the initials of both sporangia is periclinal (transverse division).

Difference between Eusporangium and Leptosporangium

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Botany lecture notes

Difference between Bryophytes and Pteridophytes (Comparison Table)


Difference between Pteridophytes and Bryophytes

Bryophytes vs Pteridophytes
(Similarities and Difference between Bryophytes and Pteridophytes)

Bryophytes are most primitive land plants predominantly grow in moist and shaded places. Bryophytes are known as the Amphibians of Plant Kingdom since water is essential for the completion of their life cycle. The Bryophytes includes three groups of plants such as Liverworts, Hornworts and Mosses.

Learn more: Bryophytes General Characteristics

Pteridophytes are better known as the ‘Vascular Cryptogams’ because they possess vascular tissue for the conduction of water and food material. They occupy an intermediate position between Bryophytes and Phanerogams (seed plants).

Bryophytes and Pteridophytes are evolutionarily related and they show many similarities. The present post discusses the Similarities and Differences between Bryophytes and Pteridophytes (with a comparison table).

Similarities between Bryophytes and Pteridophytes

Ø  Both Bryophytes and Pteridophytes are land plants.

Ø  Both possess distinct Gametophytic and Sporophytic generations.

Ø  Both groups show heteromorphic alternation of generation.

Ø  Rhizoids are present in Bryophytes and Pteridophytes.

Ø  Stomata or pores are present in both groups for gaseous exchange.

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Lecture notes in Microbiology

Difference between Bacterial Endospores and Vegetative Cells- A Comparison Table


Difference between Vegetative cell and endospores

Vegetative Cells vs Endospores of Bacteria
(Difference between Vegetative Cells and Endospores of Bacteria)

Endospore of bacteria

Bacterial Endospores under Phase-contrast microscope

Bacterial endospores are special tough, dormant and resistant spores produced by some Gram-positive bacteria of during unfavorable environmental conditions. They help the bacteria to endure the unfavorable conditions. The endospores are structurally, metabolically and functionally very different from bacterial vegetative cells. In the previous post, we have discussed about the Structure, Characteristics, Significance and Formation of Endospores. In this post, we will discuss about the Difference between a Bacterial Endospore and Vegetative Cell with a Comparison Table.

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Lecture notes in Microbiology

Difference between Pili and Flagella of Bacteria- A Comparison Table


Fimbria vs pilus

Flagella vs Pili of Bacteria: A Comparison Table
(Similarities and Differences between Pili and Flagella of Bacteria)

Both Flagellum (plural Flagella) and Pilus (plural Pili) are the filamentous proteinaceous structures found on the surface of some bacterial cells. They extend from the surface of the bacterial cell wall and can have many functions such as motility, attachment, adhesion and assisting in genetic exchange.

Flagella definition: Bacterial flagella are long whip-like filamentous structures present in some bacteria. The most important function of flagella is to assist in locomotion. Flagella can also act as a sensory organ to detect temperature and the presence of certain chemicals in the external environment of the cell. Even though the flagella are present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, both are entirely different in their structure, formation and mechanism of propulsion.

Pili definition: Pili are long hair like tubular micro-fibres like structures present on the surface of some Gram-negative bacteria. They are comparatively shorter filamentous structures than flagella and their number per cell is very limited. There are many classes of pili based on their structure and function. Most of the pili can act as the receptors of some viruses.

The present post describes the Similarities and Differences between Flagella and Pili with a Comparison Table

Similarities between Flagella and Pili

Ø  Both flagella and pili are filamentous structures.

Ø  Both are cell surface appendages.

Ø  Both are made up of proteins.

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Lecture notes in Microbiology

Difference between Flagella and Fimbriae of Bacteria- A Comparison Table


Difference between Fimbriae and Flagella

Fimbriae vs Flagella
(Similarities and Differences between Fimbriae and Flagella of Bacteria)

Both Fimbria (plural Fimbriae) and Flagellum (plural flagella) are the filamentous proteinaceous structures found on the surface of some bacterial cells. 

Fimbriae definition: Fimbriae are bristle like short fibres occurs on the surface of some Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Fimbriae enable the bacterial cell to stick to the surface of host cells. They also help in the formation of pellicles or biofilms. (Pellicle: thin sheet of cells on the surface of a liquid).

Flagella definition: Bacterial flagella are long whip like filamentous structures present in some bacteria. The most important function of flagella is to assist in locomotion. Flagella can also act as a sensory organ to detect temperature and the presence of certain chemicals in the external environment of the cell. Even though the flagella are present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, both are entirely different in their structure and formation and mechanism of propulsion.

The present post describes the Similarities and Differences between Fimbriae and Flagella of bacteria with a Comparison Table.

Similarities between Fimbriae and Flagella

Ø  Both fimbriae and flagella are filamentous structures.

Ø  Both are present in Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria.

Ø  Both are cell surface appendages, present on the cell surface of bacteria.

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