Difference between Transpiration and Guttation – A Comparison Table


Transpiration vs Guttation

Transpiration vs Guttation (A Comparison Table)
(Similarities and Differences between Transpiration and Guttation Process)

Transpiration and Guttation are the two physiological events in plants by which the plants release water to the external atmosphere.

Transpiration: Transpiration is the excessive loss of water from the aerial portion of plants as water vapours. Even though the transpiration results in excessive loss of water, it helps to maintain the continuous absorption water from the soil through a force called the ‘Transpiration Pull’. Thus, the transpiration is considered as a ‘Necessary Evil’ in plants.

Guttation: Guttation is the process of secretion of liquid water through the leaf tips in some plants. These plants possess a specialized structure at their leaf tip and margins called Hydathodes. The guttation usually occurs in the morning time when the atmosphere humidity will be high and the rate of transpiration will be low.

Similarities between Transpiration and Guttation

Ø  Both transpiration and guttation primarily occurs though leaf.

Ø  In both cases, the water is lost through specialized pores.

Ø  Both transpiration and guttation cause permanent water loss from the plant.

Difference between Transpiration and Guttation

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Difference between Stomata and Hydathodes (A Comparison Table)


Stomata vs Hydathodes Comparison

Stomata vs Hydathodes (A Comparison Table)
(Similarities and Differences between Stomata and Hydathodes)

Stomata and Hydathodes are specialized pores present in the aerial parts of plants associated with the release of water from the plant body to the surrounding environment.

Stomata: They are specialized pores present on the surface aerial plant parts especially on the lower epidermis of leaf, which facilitate Gaseous exchange and Transpiration. The stomatal pores are guarded by a pair of specialized epidermal cells called the Guard Cells. The guard cells can regulate the opening and closing of the stomatal pore and thereby regulate the gaseous exchange through the stomata.

Hydathode (Water Stomata): Hydathode is a secretory tissue commonly found in the leaves of Angiosperms. They are pore-like structures present on the leaf margin through which water is secreted out as droplets. This type of secretion is called Guttation.

The present post describes the Similarities and Differences between Stomata and Hydathodes with a Comparison Table

Similarities between Stomata and Hydathodes

Ø  Both Stomata and Hydathodes are pores which opens to the exterior environment.

Ø  Both are primarily present on leaves.

Ø  Both stomata and hydathodes are completely composed of living cells.

Ø  Both can release water to the atmosphere.




Difference between Stomata and Hydathodes

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Difference between Leptosporangium and Eusporangium (Comparison Table)


Leptosporangium vs eusporangium Development

Eusporangia vs Leptosporangia
(Similarities and Differences between Leptosporangia and Eusporangia of Pteridophytes)

Sporangia are the specialized spore producing structures found in plants. In Pteridophytes, two types of sporangia are present. The two types of sporangia are (1) Eusporangium and (2) Leptosporangium. This classification is proposed by Goebel in 1881 based on the developmental pattern of sporangia. The spores produced in the Eusporangium are called eusporangiospores and those produced in the Leptosporangium are called leptosporangiospores.

Eusporangium: The sporangium develops from a GROUP of INITIAL cells and such a development is called development.

Leptosporangium: The sporangium develops from a SINGLE INITIAL cell and such a development is called Leptosporangiate development.

The present post describes the Similarities and Differences between a Eusporangium and Leptosporangium.

Similarities between Eusporangium and Leptosporangium

Ø  Both Eusporangia and Leptosporangia are the spore producing structures in vascular plants.

Ø  Both are formed on the sporophyll (a specialized leaf) of the diploid sporophytic plant.

Ø  Both produce haploid spores after meiosis.

Ø  The first division of the initials of both sporangia is periclinal (transverse division).

Difference between Eusporangium and Leptosporangium

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Pteridophytes: General Characters (with Power Point Presentation – PPT)


General Characters of Pteridophytes

Pteridophytes General Characteristics
(General Characters of Pteridophytes – The Vascular Cryptogams)

Pteridophytes are plants with Feather like Leaves

Pteridophytes are a group of primitive land plants belongs to the Cryptogams. They are the first evolved plant group with vascular tissue system for the conduction of water and food materials. Due to the presence of vascular tissue, they are called as Vascular Cryptogams. The term Pteridophyte is derived from two words ‘Pteron’ meaning feather and ‘phyton’ meaning plant. Thus, Pteridophytes are the plants with Feather-like leaves. Pteridophytes occupy the intermediate position between Bryophytes and Phanerogams (seed plants). The important characteristics of Pteridophytes are summarized below:

Pteridophyta General CharactersØ  The division Pteridophyta includes primitive living and fossil vascular plants.

Ø  They were originated in the Silurian period and flourished in the Devonian period.

Ø  They are known as ‘Vascular Cryptogams’ – cryptogams with vascular system.

Ø  They show heteromorphic alternation of generation with prominent Sporophytic and Gametophytic phases.

Ø  The main plant body of Pteridophyte is the sporophytic plant (diploid).

Ø  The gametophytic and sporophytic generations are two independent plants (not physically connected).

Habit and Habitat of Pteridophytes

Ø  Pteridophytes show much variation in form, size, and habitat.

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Difference between Bryophytes and Pteridophytes (Comparison Table)


Difference between Pteridophytes and Bryophytes

Bryophytes vs Pteridophytes
(Similarities and Difference between Bryophytes and Pteridophytes)

Bryophytes are most primitive land plants predominantly grow in moist and shaded places. Bryophytes are known as the Amphibians of Plant Kingdom since water is essential for the completion of their life cycle. The Bryophytes includes three groups of plants such as Liverworts, Hornworts and Mosses.

Learn more: Bryophytes General Characteristics

Pteridophytes are better known as the ‘Vascular Cryptogams’ because they possess vascular tissue for the conduction of water and food material. They occupy an intermediate position between Bryophytes and Phanerogams (seed plants).

Bryophytes and Pteridophytes are evolutionarily related and they show many similarities. The present post discusses the Similarities and Differences between Bryophytes and Pteridophytes (with a comparison table).

Similarities between Bryophytes and Pteridophytes

Ø  Both Bryophytes and Pteridophytes are land plants.

Ø  Both possess distinct Gametophytic and Sporophytic generations.

Ø  Both groups show heteromorphic alternation of generation.

Ø  Rhizoids are present in Bryophytes and Pteridophytes.

Ø  Stomata or pores are present in both groups for gaseous exchange.

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