Difference between GM Counter and Proportional Counter


GM Counter vs Proportional Counter

Proportional Counter vs GM Counter
(Difference between Proportional Counter and GM Counter)

Proportional counter and GM counters are devices to detect and quantify radiations. The proportional counter is able to detect the energy of incident radiation and produce an output proportional to the intensity of the radiation. A GM counter detects ionizing radiation such as alpha particles, beta particles and gamma rays using the ionization effect produced in a Geiger–Müller tube. Both the instruments can quantify the intensity of radiation and have immense application in research, medicine and nuclear industry. The present post discusses the differences between a Proportional counter and a GM counter with a comparison table.

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Difference between GM Counter and Scintillation Counter


GM Counter vs Scintillation Counter

GM Counter vs Scintillation Counter
(Similarities and Differences between GM Counter and Scintillation Counter)

Geiger–Müller or GM Counter and Scintillation Counter are two commonly used devices to detect and quantify the radiation. The GM counter can detect all kinds of radiations such as alpha, beta and gamma rays, whereas the scintillation counter can detect only ionizing radiations. There are considerable differences in the working principle and applicability of GM counter and the Scintillation counter. The present post discusses the difference between G.M. Counter and Scintillation counter with a comparison table.

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Difference between Gas Solid Chromatography and Gas Liquid Chromatography: Comparison Table


Difference between GSC and GLC

Gas-Solid Chromatography (GSC) vs Gas-Liquid Chromatography (GLC)
(Difference between GSC and GLC Chromatography)

Gas Chromatography or GC is a chromatographic technique used for the separation of volatile compounds. In GC, a mixture of volatile compounds with differential migration passes through a column containing solid or liquid stationary phase. In GC, the mixture to be separated should be in gaseous phase and the mobile phase used will be always in the gaseous state (usually an inert gas such as nitrogen, helium or argon). Based on the states of stationary phases, there are two types of Gas Chromatography techniques: (1) Gas Solid Chromatography (GSC) and (2) Gas Liquid Chromatography (GLC).

(1). Gas Solid Chromatography (GSC): In GSC, the stationary phase is in the solid state (liquid phase is absent). The stationary phase is coated in the interior of the column. Molecules in the stationary phase will interact with the mobile phase through adsorption forces.

(2). Gas Liquid Chromatography (GLC): In GLC, the stationary phase is a nonvolatile liquid. The liquid stationary phase is coated on an inert support in the column. The mobile phase will be an inert gas such as nitrogen, helium or argon.

There are considerable differences in the working principle, mobile and stationary phase and the efficiency of GSC and GLC. The present post discusses the similarities and differences between Gas Solid Chromatography (GSC) and Gas Liquid Chromatography (GLC) with a comparison table.

Similarities between Gas Liquid and Gas Solid Chromatography

Ø  Both are GSC and GLC are Gas chromatographic techniques.

Ø  Both uses gaseous mobile phase (usually an inert gas such as N, He etc.).

Ø  Both are used for the separation of volatile compounds / mixtures.

Ø  Heat labile compounds cannot be separated.

Ø  Both GSC and GLC can be analytic or preparatory.

Ø  Both types of GC use similar type of detectors.

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Difference between Phase Contrast Microscopy and Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy: (Easy Short Notes)


Phase Contrast vs DIC Microscopy

Phase Contrast Microscope vs Differential Interference Contrast Microscope
(Similarities and Differences between Phase Contrast Microscope and Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) Microscope)

Phase contrast microscopy and Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) microscopy are two advanced optical light microscopy techniques to produce high contrast images of unstained and living cells. Both the microscopes utilize various contrast enhancing techniques to produce high contrast images.

Phase contrast microscopy is an optical-microscopy technique developed by Frits Zernike in 1934 to produce high contrast images of unstained live specimens. The phase contrast microscopy works by converting the phase shifts of light passing through a transparent specimen to detectable brightness changes in the image.

Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) microscopy, also called as Nomarski Interference Contrast (NIC) Microscopy, was first invented by Georges Nomarski in 1952. DIC microscopy uses more sophisticated contrast enhancing techniques than phase contrast system. It works by separating a polarized light source into two orthogonally polarized mutually coherent parts which are spatially displaced at the sample plane, and recombined before the final image formation. DIC produce more pronounced contrast difference than phase contrast image.

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Difference between Covalent Bond and Hydrogen Bond – Comparison Table


Compare covalent and hydrogen bond

Covalent Bond vs Hydrogen Bond
(Similarities and Differences between Covalent Bond and Hydrogen Bond)

The chemical bonds are stable attractions between atoms, ions or molecules. The formation of chemical bonds allows the formation of molecules or compounds. Chemical bonds are classified into different categories based on their formation and strength. They are categorized as Covalent bonds, Ionic bonds, Metallic bonds, Dipole-dipole interactions, London dispersion forces and Hydrogen bonds. The present post discusses about the Differences between the Covalent bond and Hydrogen bond with a Comparison Table.

Covalent bond is a primary chemical bond formed by the sharing of electron pairs. Covalent bonds are strong bonds with greater bond energy.

Hydrogen bond is a weak electrostatic attraction between the hydrogen and an electronegative atom due to their difference in electronegativity. Individual hydrogen bonds are weak bonds however, their presence in large number provide them considerable strength.

Learn more: Covalent Bond vs Ionic Bond

Learn more: Covalent Bond vs Metallic Bond

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